Building a new pc from scratch

I finally decided to replace my current AMD64 3200 setup with something new. My old system has served me well for 4 years, but it is time for a change.
Instead of buying a prebuilt system I have decided to build it from scratch. This enables me to pick the best components and to integrate them to my specifications.
I want a powerful pc that is quiet in day-to-day use (a bit of noise when playing the occasional game is allowed).
After a lot of research I decided on the following set of components (links go to product website or review):
  • Antec P183 case
    I like the dual-chamber and the attention to detail.
  • Antec CP-850 PSU
    Custom PSU for the P183 case. I know it is a bit overkill, but I want to keep using this case and PSU for the next few years. This baby should be able to power a dual (perhaps even triple) GPU setup if I want to.
  • Intel i7-860 CPU
    Best price-performance for a quad-core so far.
  • Noctua NH-U12P SE2 CPU cooler 
    Quiet, quiet, quiet. Six years warranty (yes, including the fans). That says something about the manufacturer’s confidence in this product.
  • Asus P7P55D PRO motherboard
    I usually stick with Asus.
  • 8 gigabytes of Kingston memory
    The more, the merrier. I always stick with brand names when it comes to memory. A 64-bit OS is of course a necessity with this much RAM.
  • Sapphire HD4890 Vapor-X 2GB graphics card
    The Vapor-X technology keeps this card as quiet as possible. I actually wanted a HD5850 but ATI has problems getting them out to the customers – decided I didn’t want to wait until they finally become available.
  • Samsung DVD player/writer
  • Samsung 1TB HD103SJ HDD
  • Samsung Syncmaster 245B monitor
    24 inch, 1920 x 1200 resolution and a nice swivel stand for your ergonomic needs. Maybe I’ll go for a multi-monitor setup in the future.
Because it has been a while since I built my pc, I took a refresher course in pc-assembly at Jeff Atwood’s site. Recommended!

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